Why a Curriculum for Life?

The world is changing at a rapidly increasing rate and established systems are struggling to keep pace. Education has the opportunity to expand its scope and deliver the learning that young people want and need to navigate their future and thrive in the 21st century. 

The Curriculum for Life addresses three main challenges presented by current non-academic learning, which we refer to as 21st Century Learning (21CL). Our contribution in response to these challenges is to provide a curriculum that is coherent, holistic and available to all young people. Learners and practitioners will be equipped and supported with a Curriculum for Life fit for 21st Century Learning.​

Three main challenges of the CfL:

Fragmentation: ​

The provision of 21CL for schools is often fragmented, making it challenging for educators to chart a coherent course through the material available. This is well documented in The Harvard review.

Specialisation: ​

Much excellent 21CL material is already available to schools but it often addresses narrow themes and focusses on Social-Emotional Learning for early years. Our observation is that important contributions are as yet not included, especially in the later school years.

Availability:

The fragmented and specialised nature of the existing provision means that it is difficult for educators to include high quality 21CL as part of their offering​.

Our contribution in response to these challenges is to provide a curriculum that is coherent, holistic and available to all young people. Learners and practitioners will be equipped and supported with a Curriculum for Life fit for 21st Century Learning.

Quotation Marks Dark

Some programs are focused on “character traits” such as honesty, while others focus on skills like understanding emotions and solving problems, or a core theme like identity development. Some programs use discussions as the primary learning activity, while others are movement-based or game-oriented. Some programs have extensive family engagement or teacher professional development components, while others have none. Some programs are designed to be highly flexible and adaptable to context, while others are scripted and uniform. These differences matter to schools, families, out-of-school-time organisations, researchers, and policymakers because they signal differences in what gets taught and how.

Harvard Business Review

Our Theory of Change

We are generating a previously unachievable collective resource by bringing together the community, partners and tools required to support non-academic learning in a radically enhanced way.

In doing so, we are enabling young people and practitioners to develop the rounded educational experience reflective of the needs of 21st century learners. This makes a critical contribution to the evolution in non-academic learning and its availability and accessibility to all students.

The results of our endeavour is to support an innovative and evolving, holistic educational provision that benefits students, schools, families, communities, society and collective and planetary wellbeing.